Friday, 21 January 2022

Online Wellbeing and Writing Sessions

 

Hornsea Writer, Shellie Horst, has teamed up with the region’s NHS Recovery College to deliver free writing sessions to help boost creativity and well-being. 

As writers, our cognitive ability to juggle all our characters’ needs (yes, they want to be heard!) on top of those of family, work, and home is precious. Thanks to the move to working from home and limited opportunities to hide in an author’s favourite coffee shop doesn’t do good for the word count. 

But we are more than authors, we’re human beings. 

Most people overlook the importance of taking time for themselves, especially with the impact of the pandemic. Now many of us are racing to pick up the pieces we happily set down for the sake of our loved ones, wondering how we managed it all before. Our well-being affects our mood, and as writers, our creativity.

The nation is still recovering from the stress and strain of being confined to our homes, standing on one too many Lego pieces, and being able to fathom what rules apply to us from week to week. There’s only so much TikTok and sourdough a person can consume before it reduces them to a twitchy mess. Now more than ever, we have to be kind to ourselves.

Of course, we as writers know just how difficult it is to find time to write. Sessions run every Thursday from 1pm until 2.30pm. Each session merges the need to set aside that time with exercises to spark a story and journaling to help get you on track. 

Journaling is a technique authors often used to capture the essence of a mood and it can often prove useful when developing characters or honing your descriptive skills.

Regular attendees will discover how to grow stories and prepare them for publication. Not everyone writes for publication, but those writers who wish to see their work published will then be able to see their work in print as part of the course. 

You can join in using your computer’s web browser, or Teams. No knowledge of the software is needed, just your favourite writing tools.


The sessions take place at 1pm until 2.30pm on Thursdays, online. Click here to see more from the College

The Recovery College offers a range of self-paced e-courses and live video-call sessions on our e-learning platform. It’s at your pace and without pressure. So whether the writer in you needs to stretch physical muscles, the writing ones, or chat with other creatives, there’s a session to help. 



You can find out more about Shellie and her explorations into enabling creativity and equality on her website www.shelliehorst.com or follow her antics on Facebook or Twitter

Friday, 24 December 2021

Wishing Our Readers Festive Cheer

 

As Hornsea Writers closes down for the Festive Season, members raise a glass to you, our Readers, without whom our efforts would be for nought.

We wish you personal happiness, the contentment of a good book and, most importantly, the best of health as we move into the New Year.

Life is for living – so enjoy!

 Merry Christmas

Friday, 10 December 2021

Shellie Horst – a writer of many talents

 


Shellie Horst is a writer whose work encompasses a huge range. Science fiction and fantasy are her particular passions, but she also writes articles, blog posts, reviews, Minecraft projects, advertising copy, interactive narratives ... the list goes on.

In an unconventional career change, Shellie swapped from running an ice-cream van to writing for local news sites. From there she stepped into speculative fiction, her first publication, Virtually Everything, coming in 2013 under the pen name of Beverley Argent.



Skilled not only in creative, but also technical writing, Shellie built and developed websites for other people before turning her talents to creating her own web presence when she started her creative writing degree course from which she graduated in 2015.

Since then she has found her creative talents to be in demand. In 2015 she received a Special Commission as part of the Humber Mouth Literature FestivalTen Miles East Of England: The Quest for the Lost Stories.

‘I was lucky enough to work with some amazing children at Alderman Cogan CE School in Hull,’ Shellie says. ‘And together we not only developed a story but then converted it to a game for Minecraft.’

Juggling the demands of a young family and a career in the creative arts is not easy, but Shellie manages to balance the two and has seen her own work published in a variety of anthologies including, Ages of Escafeld, Explorations through the Wormhole, and Distaff, a science fiction anthology by female authors, for which Shellie created the cover art as well as contributing a story.



Learn more about Shellie on her website.


Friday, 12 November 2021

Joy Stonehouse – Investigating family history led to a series of novels


Like many people, Joy Stonehouse decided to investigate her family history, but unlike most she didn’t stop at a family tree, but developed her research into a series of historical novels.

Joy’s maternal ancestors were the Jordans, a prominent family in Reighton, East Yorkshire, from the 1500s. She became engrossed in the skeletal parish records of the early 1700’s, their births, marriages and deaths, and imagined what day-to-day life might have been like in a close-knit and, by modern standards, isolated community.

Parish records gave her names and dates, but many other sources provided key details of 1700s life in the area. The author Daniel Defoe documented the Great Storm that hit England in November, 1703, decimating orchards and wrecking ships. Only six years later came the Great Frost when villages like Reighton were cut off for months.

Joy found further information and inspiration in the many records of 18th century beliefs, customs, folklore and the home remedies on which healthcare of the time was based. When she delved into local court records, she found plenty of evidence of her ancestors’ various misdemeanours: one Jordan was a Customs Officer, offering possible links to smuggling that was rife at the time.

‘These are novels,’ she says, ‘not documentaries. There were too many gaps, too many anomalies to be able to write an accurate history, but I hope that I’ve captured the essence of life back in the 1700s with all its tragedies and triumphs.’

Witch-bottles and Windlestraws (A Story of Reighton, Yorkshire 1703 to 1709) introduces the community in which the Jordans were respected yeoman farmers. Joy fleshes out the births, marriages and deaths of the official records into human stories of courtship, betrayal, love and death.

New Arrivals in Reighton (A Story of Reighton, Yorkshire 1709 to 1714) is the second book; the new arrivals of the title being a beautiful young girl and her brother, a handsome young ploughman. They are instantly admired by some and distrusted by others. Their presence has profound and unexpected consequences on the Jordan family as courtships and rivalries are played out.

Whisper to the Bees (A Story of Reighton, Yorkshire 1714 to 1720) due out November 2021, continues the story. The only daughter of William and Mary Jordan continues to be a challenge, especially when she finds an ally in her younger brother. While the children are thrilled with the snow and ice of the exceptional winters, a major death in the family will change everything. Drinking, smuggling and clashes with the law test the Jordan family to the limit.

Joy is currently working on the fourth book that will take the Jordan family to 1735, showing a village devoid of the influence of the former vicar and his household of women, where young men indulge in women and cruel sports, and smuggling plays a greater part in everyone’s life. This book will chart shifts in the balance of power in the village, as Joy fleshes out the scant information in the official records from the courthouse in Beverley. As before, the weather will play a key role in the fortunes of the Jordans as they face some of the worst summers on record.

Joy has two children and lives with her partner in Hornsea on the Yorkshire coast. As well as researching local history, she spends time with her young grandchildren, often on the beach exploring the rock pools. She also enjoys swimming in the sea, canoeing on the River Hull/Driffield Canal, and looks forward to annual holidays on Greek islands.

Learn more about Joy and her writing HERE.

 

Friday, 5 November 2021

So you want to write a crime novel: Part 11: Pulling it all together

 In this series of blogs, I have tried to cover how anyone with a desire to write a crime story can get from the first ideas to a finished first draft.

Of course, in order to do this, the desire must be supported by focus and determination. Writing any book is not for the faint-hearted. Writing a crime novel is  more complicated because of the need for there to be a satisfactory ending. And, since the crime novel is the ultimate morality tale, most readers want that ending to be where the oh-so-clever killer gets caught.

In this month's blog, I pull together all the strands, with references to the relevant blogs, in order for the aspiring writer to have a framework in which to make their desire to write a crime novel a reality.

You can access the blog here



You can read more about me here:

Twitter    Amazon UK    Amazon USA    YouTube    Facebook


Friday, 15 October 2021

Karen Wolfe – a writer with a lifelong affinity for dogs


Karen Wolfe is an award-winning author, having won the Square Dog Northern writers contest in 2006 and 2009 with stories subsequently broadcast on BBC Radio 4. Another of her stories won the 2009 Aesthetica Literary Fiction prize, and a fourth won the 2010 Village Writers award.

She remembers writing stories from the age of five or six. As she grew up, she graduated from fairies and pirates to adventure tales driven by her favourite books or TV shows. Programmes about cowboys led her to write about the exploits of daring children and their ponies; dogs often had prominent roles in her prose, initially prompted by Enid Blyton’s Famous Five, then progressing, via The Jungle Book, to wild animals, primarily wolves, tamed and trained by Karen herself.

Karen always had an affinity for animals, especially dogs. She grew up in a wild area of the Yorkshire coast where her mother and grandmother kept a large pack of cairn terriers, who were her playmates and confidantes. She spent many childhood hours helping out at a local kennels, and riding around on a local farmer’s wild Galloway pony, when she could catch him.

At sixteen, Karen won a Yorkshire-wide essay competition, and at eighteen, went to train as a primary school teacher, studying English literature, education and evolution and pre-history.

Karen continued to write. As a mother, she created picture-books, rag-books and stories for her children. A long-time fan of Terry Pratchett, her first novels were comic fantasy following the fortunes of the beleaguered members of Barlesham Seers' Guild. She has written six Seers novels, two of which are available on Amazon.

Seers


 

Another of Karen’s long-time favourite authors was Gerald Durrell. She loved his humour and affection when he wrote about animals. Wanting to emulate that, she drew on her lifetime’s experience and observation of dogs, and started to make them central to her writing.

In 2014, having been involved in obedience training classes for some years, Karen began writing a monthly dog column for the local community newspaper https://hornseacommunitynews.uk.

Following the canine theme, Karen started a series of comic crime novels in which the protagonist is a tireless advocate for canine welfare, keeping a large and diverse pack of dogs with her at all times.

 

 

 

The third novel in this series is underway. In addition, Karen plans to put together the 90+ canine articles she has written and republish them as a book.




Friday, 1 October 2021

So you want to write a crime novel: Part 10: Dialogue

 Dialogue is a tricky thing for writers to get right. It has to read well, which dialogue in real life does not, but it has to sound authentic. In a crime novel, it has to be even tighter, give information to the reader as well as the other character(s) but also phrased to bamboozle the reader when seeding red herrings and clues.

In real life, the following dialogue would be like this:

'Hi, Mary.'

'Oh. Hi.' (uncomfortable pause)

'Long time no see. I was hoping to run into you.'

Yeah...well...been a bit busy, you know.' 

'Everything okay?'

'Not really. Mum's dying.'

'Oh, I had no idea... Is there anything I can do?'

'No. I'd better go, sorry. I forgot to buy the kids' cereal. See you. Bye.'

We learn that the unnamed first person hasn't seen Mary for some time and that Mary's mum is dying. In a conversation like this, you might put in some reactions but you would have to tighten it up and make it much shorter while giving the reader the flavour of the relationship between the two women.

'Hi Mary.'

'Oh, Liz, hi.'

'Long time no see. You look a bit harassed. Everything okay? I wanted to ask if you still make that tea to help people sleep. I could do with some. Work is crazy.'

'Mum's gone into the hospice and they've said she's close to the end.'

Liz put her hand on Mary's arm. 'Oh, love, I didn't know.'

Mary held up the box of corn flakes. 'It's affected everything. I even forgot to buy the kids' breakfast. Must go.'

Mary pushed past Liz, who turned to watch the woman scurry away. Mary's lips pursed.

In a real life situation, the second dialogue wouldn't be that "together", especially as Mary's attention appears to be solely on her mother. We also get information that Mary's mum is dying in a hospice but that she and Liz know each other but are acquaintances rather than friends. Otherwise, Liz would know about Mary's mum. And the seeded clue/red herring about the special tea that Mary makes adds tension to the dialogue.

If you want to read more about how to handle dialogue, click here

 You can read more about me here:

Twitter    Amazon UK    Amazon USA    YouTube    Facebook


Friday, 24 September 2021

Boxed Set Fantasy Romance at 99c / 99p - and other titles.

 

There's a promo on two of Linda Acaster's titles - or four books if the Torc of Moonlight Trilogy is counted as three. And it should be. The power of Three is a driving force behind the novels. There's even three years between each of the books. Three by three by three... makes 900 pages of multi-layered reading - and all for 99c / 99p.

The premise is an alternative reality for we 21st century readers, where the female guardians of springs and water courses are as real as they were in the depths of History. Read more on Linda's Page above, or check out the Trilogy at your preferred vendor:

Kindle  ¦ Nook  ¦  Smashwords
 
 ~~~~~
 
Favour short fiction? Contribution to Mankind and other stories of the Dark is a collection of speculative fiction on the more shadowy side of life, from a poignant haunting of a cycle repair shop, to a Victorian academic searching for the fabled Cylinder of Souls. Six stories in all.


Links: Kindle : Nook : Kobo : Smashwords
 
~~~~~
 
And if that's not enough, jump across to Linda's website for a link to another 25 discounted titles.  

Friday, 17 September 2021

Ann Wilkinson – award-winning writer mines tales from the coalfields of Durham

Ann Wilkinson’s earliest memories included tales told by her grandparents of life in the Durham coalfields. These sparked a fascination with social history and she spent years researching the world of those family memories, eventually producing her first novelA Sovereign For A Song (later reissued as Sing Me Home), that won the Romantic Novelists Association New Writers Award (now the Joan Hessayon Award) in 2003.

 

Ann’s debut novel became the first in a series of family sagas, as her research followed the fictional Wilde family in the years leading up to World War 1 and through the war itself.

Winning a Wife

No Price too High

Ann, now retired, enjoyed a long career in nursing, spending many years as a health visitor, ending up in the city of Hull. Using the experience of her own training, Ann went on to research medical nursing at the time of World War 2, and used the city of Hull, where she still lives, as the background to a new series of novels.

Hull, a key port, became a strategic target and suffered widespread destruction from 1941 to the end of World War 2. Ann’s second series was set against the backdrop of this war.

 

From here, Ann’s writing moved beyond world wars, but retained Hull as its setting. Her first post-war novel was The Would-be Wife.

Following this, Ann drafted The May Day Nurse, a novel set in 1950s Hull. Although the manuscript is complete, her publisher’s editorial process was significantly delayed by the 2020 global pandemic.

Learn more about Ann and her writing HERE.






Friday, 3 September 2021

So you want to write a crime novel: Part 9 - Focus

 

Focus is an essential tool in any writer's toolbox, but especially for a crime writer, where the facets of the story must be laid down so precisely.

In my blog - link below - I detail how you can organise your notes for a concentrated writing session, how to use "timed sprints" to help your productivity, where to write and healthy writing habits.

One of the most common problems writers encounter is interruptions. Because this is not a 9-5 job in an office, for which a company pays you a monthly salary, there is a widespread belief that it is "okay to interrupt X because he/she is only writing." Most writers write at home so it is easy to open the door and break the writer's concentration.

My advice is to politely but firmly state that between these two times, you are working, so you are not to be interrupted unless the house is on fire or your leg has fallen off. Why is this so important? If your train of concentration is broken, it can take 20 minutes for your brain to get back to where it was before the interruption. So, be polite but firm.

If you would like to read more about focus as a writer, click here.

 You can read more about me here:

Twitter    Amazon UK    Amazon USA    YouTube    Facebook